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Fellow Reflection: Margo Padilla

 

This post was written by Margo Padilla (@margo_padilla), who received an ARL+DLF Fellowship to attend the 2018 Forum.

Margo Padilla manages services, programs, and initiatives related to archiving and born-digital stewardship for the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO). She serves as the primary contact with archives in the METRO region and designs and implements archives-related services in Studio599. Before joining METRO in 2014, she was a resident in the inaugural cohort of the National Digital Stewardship Residency program. Prior to that, she worked at The Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley on digital projects and initiatives. Margo received her MLIS with a concentration in Management, Digitization, and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records from San Jose State University and her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley.

As a first-time attendee at the DLF Forum, I was immediately struck by the diverse group of individuals that were pulled together and the welcoming environment that was created by organizers. It felt like a space where everyone could be their authentic self and speak honestly about their experiences. This provided an opportunity to engage in impactful conversations and generated an elevated awareness on a number of different topics. It felt like a particularly critical time to be in such an environment, when long-held professional practices, methods for representation in memory organizations, and workplace and labor issues are being challenged and beginning to shift.

The sessions that drew my interest were those focused on community archives. Through my own work with independent memory projects, I have observed a rejection of mainstream archival institutions and practices. Traditional archives are, in most cases, perceived as being part of the ivory tower of academia and inaccessible to marginalized groups, a place where their stories are interpreted through the lens of white culture. In the Community Archives: New Theories of Time, Access, Community, and Agency session, panelists explained that community archives are creating a space where individuals can document their own histories and ensure collections are given the right context. While there is the desire to increase representation in traditional archival collections, the panel encouraged the audience to respect the autonomy of community archives and instead seek ways to empower independent memory workers through equitable partnerships. The support, collaboration, and autonomy fostered in digital scholarship labs is one potential model for how we can transform use of traditional archival reading rooms, changing them to learning environments where memory workers are invited to develop skills to steward their own collections. Two notable projects in this area are the Community Archives Lab at UCLA and the Southern Historical Collection’s Community-Driven Archives.

While there is the desire to increase representation in traditional archival collections, the panel encouraged the audience to respect the autonomy of community archives and instead seek ways to empower independent memory workers through equitable partnerships.

I reflected further on the perception of institutional archives during Jennifer Ferretti’s talk on the Building Community and Solidarity: Disrupting Exploitative Labor Practices in Libraries and Archives panel. In addition to pointing out the lack of POC in management and leadership roles, Ferretti called for an end to “fit culture” within LAMs which, as she pointed out, implicitly expects POC to leave their culture at the door in order to fit within the dominant white culture of the profession. As we explore issues of representation in our collections and how we might collaborate with community-based archives, we must also continue to do the work and take action to address representation within our own profession. Independent memory workers’ mistrust of traditional archives and their perception of themselves as outsiders may correlate with the absence of representation on LAM staff, an issue that may be compounded by perceiving those few POC that are in administrative roles as having to modify their identities in order to be the “right fit” for the organization.

As we explore issues of representation in our collections and how we might collaborate with community-based archives, we must also continue to do the work and take action to address representation within our own profession.

Attending the DLF Forum was a distinct conference experience and I am so grateful for the generous support that enabled me to attend a conference where involuted issues like these could be candidly discussed. I’m particularly grateful that the DLF recognizes the need to support mid-career professionals as we continue to expand our knowledge and develop our careers.

Want to know more about the DLF Forum Fellowship Program? Check out last year’s call for applications.

If you’d like to get involved with the scholarship committee for the 2019 Forum (October 13-16, 2019 in Tampa, FL), sign up to join the Planning Committee now! More information about 2019 fellowships will be posted in late spring.

The post Fellow Reflection: Margo Padilla appeared first on DLF.

Resource: ScanTent device and DocScan mobile app – Preserving our cultural heritage with a smartphone

About the resource:

The READ project is a big proponent of digitisation on demand using smartphones.

A typical mobile phone camera can capture relatively high-quality images of historical documents, which can then be used for preservation, research and even as training data for Automated Text Recognition using our Transkribus platform.

The Computer Vision Lab at the Technical University of Vienna (one of the READ project partners) have created the ScanTent device and the DocScan mobile app to make it easier for people to digitise documents in this way.

Read the full resource here.

CFP: iPRES 2019

From the CFP:

This is the full Call for Contributions for the 16th International Conference on Digital Preservation,  iPRES 2019. Deadline for all submissions is 18 March 2019. All submissions and presentations should be in English.

The theme for iPRES 2019 –  Eye on the Horizon– aims to broaden the voices and approaches participating in the conference. In keeping with the theme, we will embrace creative proposals that demonstrate how research and theory directly impact and influence practice at all levels. iPRES brings together a wide range of practitioners, researchers, educators, providers, students, and others to share lessons learned from engaging in digital preservation, including recent practice, research, developments, and innovations.

Read the full CFP here.

Funding: DHSI 2019 Tuition Fellowships

About the funding:

Want to learn more about digital humanities skills, methods, and inquiry? The Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) at the University of Victoria has a tradition of transformative training.

The University of Virginia, as a sponsoring institution of DHSI, provides 5 tuition-free fellowships to attend a Digital Humanities Summer Institute course or workshop during the summer of 2019. Students, staff, non-TT faculty, and those without access to research travel funds are especially encouraged to apply.

The fellowships entirely cover the cost of course tuition for one course, using a code at the time of registration (rather than reimbursement afterward). These fellowships do not cover travel (to Victoria, B.C.), meals, or lodging, so applicants should be prepared to fund these out of pocket or by locating additional funding sources on your own.

Read more here.

Job: Assistant Research Scholar, Digital Initiatives, NYU

From the ad:

The Library of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) at New York University seeks an Assistant Research Scholar to help develop, implement, and extend its digital projects and to participate in the scholarly life of the ISAW community. A key component of the ISAW Library’s mission is to provide access to and support for new and innovative forms of digital scholarship, scholarly communication, and pedagogy in the ancient studies. The Assistant Research Scholar will help the ISAW Library fulfill this charge by collaborating with a diverse group of academic professionals at ISAW and the NYU Division of Libraries on projects related to all or some of the following: digital libraries (e.g., the Ancient World Digital Library and Ancient World Image Bank); linked-data bibliography; digital publication; mapping projects (e.g., Pleiades); archaeological databases; digital preservation and repository projects for ancient studies scholarship; and instruction in a variety of digital tools and techniques, with the aim of helping ISAW faculty, students, and visiting research scholars take full advantage of emerging digital resources and techniques in their research and teaching. The Assistant Research Scholar will be expected to develop or pursue an independent research agenda in any area of ancient studies and library or information studies or the digital humanities. As a member of the ISAW Library team, the Assistant Research Scholar will also have core responsibilities in library operations, bibliographic and grant research, public services, and special projects associated with ISAW’s print collection and public programming.

Read the full ad here.

Report: A Conceptual Guide to Digital Academic Identity

From the report:

…One could argue that the Internet provides a similarly serendipitous space. Not only has the web changed the ways in which we, as researchers and as teachers, interact with each other and with the general public, but it also reshaped the concept of academic presence altogether. Through social media, academic social networking sites (ASNS), and blogging and micro-blogging platforms, that space has now become less ephemeral and more democratic – think, for example, of the considerably lower (financial, physical, and cultural) barriers to access its resources, compared to an academic conference.

Read the full report here.

Fellow Reflection: Chris Day

 

This post was written by Chris Day (@chrisday71), who received a GLAM Cross-Pollinator Registration Award to attend the DLF Forum.

VRA affiliate Chris Day is the Digital Services Librarian at the Flaxman Library of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

He started at SAIC in 2008, managing the library’s first digital collection, the Joan Flasch Artists’ Books Collection. In 2011 he oversaw the the deaccession of the 35mm slide library and the start of a local repository, now featuring over 200,000 images, of digital art images for teaching. The past year saw the migration of 13 digital collections from ContentDM to Islandora, which now features 4 new collections and over 26,4000 digital objects.

Learning to Live DLF

I’ve been a librarian for over twelve years and am still developing my conference skills. Conferences are valuable events, but can be difficult when you struggle to find the balance between learning opportunities and self-care. Last year, at my first DLF Forum, I found a community and atmosphere that made it easier to find peace in the chaos. This sense of ease drove my desire to make the most of my time there and bring what I learned back to my job. As 2017 turned into 2018, I looked back on my time in Pittsburgh and saw that I had used just a small portion of what I’d been exposed to. I had a notebook full of ideas, but hadn’t given myself the chance to follow-through. My personal quest for DLF Forum 2018, declared just an hour into the start of Learn@DLF, was to absorb, process, and act on what I experienced. I want to learn to live DLF.

Forum 2018 started the same way Forum 2017 finished for me, with the excellent Metadata Analysis Workshop developed by the DLF Assessment and Metadata Working groups. I wasn’t repeating the workshop because I failed to learn, I simply wanted another opportunity to act on what I had learned. One digital collection migration and clean-up wiser, I returned refreshed and ready to absorb everything. OpenRefine, regular expressions, GREL, application profiles; I wanted all that wonderful techy metadata stuff. The rush of knowledge felt real good!

I wasn’t repeating the workshop because I failed to learn, I simply wanted another opportunity to act on what I had learned. One digital collection migration and clean-up wiser, I returned refreshed and ready to absorb everything.

I made a vow, that when I got back to Chicago I would turn my pages of notes into real tasks and real projects. I would try every tool, visit every collection, read every article, and archive my favorite presentations for future referral. I lost a few days to jet lag and con crud, but I have taken positive steps towards my goals. I started with a Google Doc full of raw notes, which I’ll now organize into direct actions (digitizing historic course catalogs? create a faculty name authority list like Jeremy Floyd at UNV Reno), research opportunities (get Hope Olson’s “The power to name”), email contacts to follow-up (tell me more about your Syllabrowser project, University of Utah), and random thoughts (did I leave the download link on when I left?).

Three weeks have passed since our time in Las Vegas. How am I doing so far? I’ve had a very good start, thank you for asking. I’ve reached out to colleagues and had helpful, substantive follow-up conversations. I used new tools and skills to normalize accession numbers in our Artists’ Book collection (this allowed us to better search, filter, and analyze those numbers; I squealed like a child on their birthday when I got that to work). This is just the beginning; I have so many new projects to try that I am freshly enthused for the coming year.

And what of the next year? Will I continue to operationalize my experiences from the 2018 Forum, or will entropy take control? Between now and next fall I intend to find out.

And what of the next year? Will I continue to operationalize my experiences from the 2018 Forum, or will entropy take control? Between now and next fall I intend to find out. I will track and analyze my successes and my failures, and hope to report back in Tampa. If this proves a success, I can add another goal for the 2019 DLF Forum: pacing my physical & mental energy and make it through the whole conference without exhaustion. I’ll be seeing you in the Meditation Room!

Want to know more about the DLF Forum Fellowship Program? Check out last year’s call for applications.

If you’d like to get involved with the scholarship committee for the 2019 Forum (October 13-16, 2019 in Tampa, FL), sign up to join the Planning Committee now! More information about 2019 fellowships will be posted in late spring.

The post Fellow Reflection: Chris Day appeared first on DLF.

CFP: Right2Left at DHSI 2019

From the CFP:

#Right2Left at #DHSI2019 is interested in exploring challenges, opportunities, and implications that are distinctive to digital work in languages written from right to left such as Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Syriac. We are soliciting proposals for a half-day workshop to take place on 8 June 2019, between the first and second week of DHSI.

Topics for exploration might include:

  • multi-directional texts
  • digital methods and RTL scripts
  • RTL workarounds
  • pre-Unicode histories of RTL digital environments
  • LTR transliteration/approximation of RTL languages
  • digital literacies in RTL environments
  • minimal RTL computing
  • digital pedagogy for RTL languages
  • RTL TEI XML
  • localisation for RTL cultures
  • rethinking DH for RTL languages
  • RTL digital cultures and the humanities
  • RTL digitality for research and pedagogy in the social sciences
  • RTL digital cultures and public users’ behaviour

Read the full CFP here.

CFP: Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries 2019

From the CFP:

The Association of Caribbean University, Research and Institutional Libraries (ACURIL) is excited to announce that its 49th Conference to be held from June 2-9, 2019, on the happy island of Aruba, will focus on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) which are the framework of the UN 2030 agenda. Our conference theme is: Access and opportunity for all: Caribbean Libraries, Archives and Museums Supporting the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

In September 2015 the member states of the United Nations (UN) adopted “Transforming our world: The 2030 agenda for sustainable development which includes Seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) spanning economic, environmental and social development. Caribbean librarians and other information professionals contribute to improved outcomes across the SDGs by promoting universal literacy, closing gaps in access to information, advancing digital inclusion, serving as the heart of the research and academic community and preserving and providing access to the world’s culture and heritage.”

Read the full CFP here.

Job: Digital Humanities Senior Research Scientist, MIT

From the ad:

Develop tools for unlocking faculty research in the humanities at MIT. Program frameworks in Python and JavaScript for immediate use and/or that can be reused in future Digital Humanities projects. Aided by Postdoctoral Associates, manages the work of undergraduate researchers in building out aspects of faculty research and teaching. Stay abreast of and embrace new technology in order to meet continuous evolving technical needs. Writes tutorials and other documentation for lab activities. Answer questions (including holding drop-in hours) from MIT students, research assistants, and faculty and aid in setting challenging but manageable expectations for the intersection of computing and the humanities. Aid in gathering information and code output for lab publications.

Read the full ad here.

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