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Job: Research Data Specialist, Case Western Reserve University

From the ad:

Working independently and with initiative, the Research Data Specialist position is a non-supervisory position that reports to the digital learning and scholarship team leader. The RDS will provide leadership and expertise in the areas of quantitative and qualitative data analysis, geospatial data visualization, working in collaboration with campus-wide initiatives around research data management, providing guidance and creating best practices for ethical data creation, production and dissemination.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Online Learning Librarian, Penn State

From the ad:

The Pennsylvania State University Libraries seeks applications and nominations for the position of Online Learning Librarian. The campus library seeks a proactive, creative, and inventive librarian to fill a tenure track, faculty position as part of Penn State University Libraries.  The person appointed to this position will be responsible for coordinating and growing University Libraries online learning initiatives as a cohesive and strategic program situated within the University Libraries information literacy, teaching, and learning program.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Director of Library Technology and Collection Management, CSU Fresno

From the ad:

The Director is primarily responsible for developing strategic directions for managing access to physical and virtual collections and digital services and is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the Technology Services and Collection Management Division including materials in all formats, electronic resources management, collection development and collections budget management, and cataloging in all formats. The Director also leads this division in meeting and expanding library and digital scholarship needs and ensuring the continued implementation of technologies that serve teaching and research at Fresno State.

Read the full ad here.

Announcement: Geolocation Plugin 3.0 – Omeka

From the announcement:

Big changes have come to the Geolocation plugin for Omeka Classic with today’s release of version 3.0!

This new version uses the service Leaflet to provide maps, rather than Google Maps. Not only does this mean you no longer need to worry about registering for an API key, but you can now choose from a wide variety of base maps, including some without labels or human-defined borders. In addition, technically skilled users can use the service MapBox to create custom map layers for use in their Omeka Classic site.

Read the full announcement here.

Job: Digital Services and Research Librarian, Bryant University

From the ad:

The Digital Services and Research Librarian will facilitate and perform a leading role in the library’s emerging digital scholarship and digitization initiatives. Working with other librarians, students, faculty, and campus and community partners, the incumbent will develop, implement, and support library services that focus on current and emerging research, teaching, and innovation at Bryant University. The Librarian will assist in implementing strategies for publishing and integrating digital scholarship into the library and Bryant community.

Read the full ad here.

CFParticipation: Hands Up for Digital Humanities Survey

About the survey:

This survey is concerned with the knowledge gaps around DH within University and Further Educational settings, however, you don’t have to be currently attending or working in education to respond to this survey. Your engagement with Humanities might stem from previous jobs or qualifications, employment in a related area such as libraries or charities, or you may simply have an individual interest. Whatever your position, your response will help to highlight gaps in DH and enable them to be addressed. I believe that a more streamlined and transparent approach to DH will improve skill-sets developed throughout the years of study, and help to provide a more coherent trajectory as students leave education and embark on a career.

Read more here.

CFParticipation: Network Analysis + Digital Art History Workshop

From the CFParticipation:

The NA+DAH Workshop is a Getty Foundation-supported event that will bring together art historians, network scientists, and digital humanists to advance research at the intersection of these fields. Directed by Alison Langmead (University of Pittsburgh), Anne Helmreich (Texas Christian University), and Scott B. Weingart (Carnegie Mellon University)—all scholars engaged with digital art history and network analysis—the Network Analysis + Digital Art History Workshop will unfold over a full year and will be framed by two face-to-face convenings held at the University of Pittsburgh, a schedule that will allow participants to learn advanced digital methods and project management skills while fostering a close-knit interdisciplinary community.

Read more here.

Editors’ Choice: Digitization ≠ Repatriation

This week over at Hyperallergic, I wrote about new exhibits at the British Library and the Victoria & Albert Museum which both engage with the cultural heritage of ancient and medieval Ethiopia. An examination of the Ethiopian cultural heritage held in the libraries and museums of Britain can perhaps demonstrate a seminal point about digitization and the digital humanities more broadly: Digital editions can never fully replace an analog object. No matter how many manuscripts we digitize and make available online or 3D scans we create of the Parthenon frieze, they are not a replacement for repatriation.

One reason for both of the UK exhibits this year is the 150th anniversary of the British army’s Abyssinian Expedition of 1868. The campaign was ostensibly in reaction to the holding of British hostages by Tewodros II (also called Theodore), who was the Coptic Christian ruler of Abyssinia; the core of what is today called Ethiopia. Ethiopia has been a Christian country since the fourth century CE, making copies of the Gospels and the stories of saint a central part of their rich manuscript tradition in later years.

The emperor ultimately committed suicide as 13,000 British military troops descended upon the capital city of Maqdala (or Magdala). The hostages were freed unharmed, but the expedition ultimately became more about treasure than human life. It reportedly took 15 elephants and 300 mules to haul all of the loot from the decimated region. In a manner rather reminiscent of the Siege of Jerusalem (70 CE) and the , priceless cultural objects were pilfered and then sent to London for sale.

Many of the manuscripts, royal crowns, and other precious cultural patrimony were sold at auction to various British cultural institutions: the British Museum, the Royal Library, the Bodleian Library at Oxford, Cambridge University Library, the John Rylands Library, the South Kensington Museum (later renamed the Victoria & Albert), the Museum of Mankind, and the National Army Museum (Ofcansky and Shinn 2004: 48). Although not online, it has been widely reported that at the Bodleian Library there is a penciled notation on a manuscript (MS Aeth. d. 1) that states in English,“taken from a church at Maqdala in 1868.” There is little question where many of these objects originally came from and how they were acquired.

 

Read the full post here.

Three Questions on IRUS-USA

For this special edition of DLF Contribute, we explore IRUS-USA (Institutional Repository Usage Statistics USA), an experimental collaboration between Jisc and the Digital Library Federation (DLF) at CLIR

Paul Needham
Santi Thompson
Santi Thompson

Jo Lambert manages services and projects at Jisc, a UK registered charity that champions the use of digital technologies in education and research. Paul Needham is the Research and Innovation Manager at Kings Norton Library, Cranfield University. Santi Thompson is the Head of Digital Research Services at the University of Houston (UH) Libraries and a co-leader of the DLF Assessment Interest Group (AIG).

Jo and Paul, could you tell us a bit about IRUS-UK? What has been Jisc’s motivation for developing and investing in a system like this?

Jo and Paul: 15 years ago, institutional repositories (IRs) were the new in-thing. Higher education institutions, just about everywhere, were setting up institutional repositories. Money was being spent, time and effort were being expended . . . but there was no way to reliably demonstrate the usage and impact of those repositories. Sure, statistics were being generated—but everyone was doing it differently, applying their own rules to processing data, and many figures produced were vastly inflated by search engine and robotic usage. We were trying to compare apples and oranges. The statistics lacked credibility.

So that’s why we started IRUS-UK—the first service to enable IRs to expose and share usage statistics based on a global standard—COUNTER. The COUNTER standard is the one that traditional scholarly publishers and aggregators like Elsevier, Springer, EBSCO, etc. all adhere to when producing usage statistics. We all follow the same rules and usage data are filtered to remove robots and double clicks, so the statistics are reliable, trustworthy, authoritative, and comparable.

IRs use IRUS to monitor and benchmark usage of their research against similar organisations in a meaningful way. It provides Jisc with a view of UK repository use to demonstrate the value and impact of IRs. And it provides a UK-wide launch pad for collaborating with other national and international initiatives, projects, and services. We were really interested to hear about DLF AIG work and as our conversations developed our common interests became more and more apparent. A mutual interest in tools to measure impact, develop benchmarks, and share ideas and good practice prompted the collaboration that has since morphed into IRUS-USA.

Santi, as co-chair of the DLF Assessment Interest Group (AIG), what DLF AIG connections and research interest led you to recommending our current IRUS-USA pilot project?

Santi: The JISC-funded Institutional Repository Usage Statistics (IRUS) aggregation project excited me for several reasons. First, I have found difficulty in gaining access to standardized usage statistics for scholarly works repositories. While many systems offer built-in statistics features, they often lack documentation that offers details on how they work, including what they do (and do not) count. With the COUNTER standard acting as the foundation for the aggregation service, IRUS draws upon standardized practices to deliver usage statistics across a shared community, giving managers access to a diverse range of data. The ability to query the usage statistics by formats and benchmark against other member institutions offers repository managers collection development tools often lacking in institutional repository environments.

The work of IRUS also intersects nicely with current and former projects sponsored by the DLF AIG. A former working group, the Web Analytics Working Group, focused a large portion of their efforts on compiling information on various analytic tools and services that could aid in assessing repositories. In 2015 the group published a white paper on the use of Google Analytics in Digital Libraries. The group followed up this work in 2016-2017 by developing an annotated bibliography on how libraries use web analytics to assess their programs, collaborate with other institutions, and make decisions. There work provides a great overview of the world of usage analytics.

Another AIG group, the Content Reuse subgroup of the User Studies Working Group, is currently investigating how best to assess the reuse of digital objects. With funding from IMLS (Developing a Framework for Measuring Reuse of Digital Objects [LG-73-17-0002-17]), the group is aiming to expand upon standardized usage statistics to better understand how users utilize or transform unique materials from library-hosted digital collections. The team believes that leveraging usage statistics, like the kind provided by IRUS, and reuse information will provide practitioners with a richer set of data in which to highlight the value of digital repositories and cultural heritage organizations.

What are all three of you geeking out on? (Or, what is the most interesting thing you’ve learned through this IRUS-USA initiative?)

Santi: My participation in projects like the IRUS-USA pilot program and the Measuring Reuse grant program have me obsessed with better understanding digital library users and reuses. The deep dive that I and my colleagues have taken on who uses digital library materials and for what purposes has allowed me to see how digital libraries are just as much of a “public good” or “public service” as they are a scholarly resource. There are countless anecdotes of how “everyday” people are using digital library objects for a variety of purposes—personal research, genealogy and family history, artistic expression and creation among others. However, I am not sure how well we, as a profession, have embraced the “public good” aspects of digital libraries and think that more attention can be given to the relationship between digital libraries and the “everyday” user. I will continue to collaborate with colleagues to explore this relationship.

Jo and Paul: After several years of developing IRUS within the UK, we’re geeking out on seeing a growing appetite for an international family of services that can interoperate with one another to provide a global picture of IR and OA usage. We developed IRUS-UK by working with universities to understand what they need and then delivering a service to meet that need, so we’re hyped to have a US dimension to IRUS through the IRUS-USA pilot project, and excited about the potential for international measurement and benchmarking. Working with CLIR and DLF AIG folks has given us a greater insight into work in the US right now around use and perceptions of analytics. It’s enabled us to learn from their ideas and approaches and to work collaboratively to develop a pilot service. We’re looking forward to working with our colleagues in the US in the coming months and years.

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The post Three Questions on IRUS-USA appeared first on DLF.

Job: Creation and Innovation Services Librarian, Miami University

From the ad:

Miami University Libraries seeks a dynamic and creative Creation and Innovation Services Librarian for the Create and Innovate department, one of six newly formed departments that emerged from a 2017 Libraries master planning process that examined services, organization and facilities.  This position will join a team currently working and supporting digital scholarship, digital humanities, GIS services, open educational resources, 3D printing, collaborative learning spaces, and high-end multimedia labs.

Read the full ad here.

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