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DHSI

Fellow Reflection: Marcia McIntosh

This  reflection on the 2019 Digital Humanities Summer Institute was written by Marcia McIntosh, who attended with support from a  DLF+DHSI Tuition Grant. Marcia  received her master’s degree in Information Studies (MSIS) from the University of Texas at Austin School of Information and bachelors from Washington University in St. Louis. She is currently the Digital Production Librarian at the University of North Texas where she assists in the management of digitization projects in the Digital Projects Lab. Alongside imaging production work, she pursues research in the areas of digitization, project development, and 3D data preservation.   hanks to the DLF+DHSI tuition scholarship and travel funding from the University of North Texas Libraries, I was able to journey to Victoria, BC to attend the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI). This year’s institute took place June 3-7, 2019 at the University of Victoria. As a first time attendee, I enrolled in the course Modeling. Virtual. Realities. A Practical Introduction to Virtual (and Augmented) Reality. The instructors, the wonderful Zoe Schubert and Jan G. Wieners, walked my classmates and me into the third dimension with poise and clarity that I very much appreciated. The class was my first foray into Virtual Reality (VR) creation. I had some experience with 3D scanning book history materials but never putting them into a virtual space. The class began with a thorough tutorial on HTML and CSS webpage creation. Each student created and presented their webpages to the class giving us experience coding. Through this exercise, we were able to learn about each other’s familiarity with 3D and VR. The HTML/CSS foundation allowed us to get in and tinker with Threejs. This web application allows users to create VR scenes by editing an HTML file. We learned how to move, add, and animate items in a VR scene. We also got an introduction to modeling in Autodesk 3Ds Max. Later in the week, we formed small groups to create 3D scenes. My group members, Gianna May Sanchez and Maayan Ornath, created a Picnic scene complete with blue sky, basket, tea set, cookie, peach, with an animated butterfly and ladybug. We were also able to view the scenes in cardboard viewers.   At the end of the week, a fellow student arranged a field trip to a Virtual Reality Room on campus. The class got to try out some professional scenes as well as the scenes we had created. In addition to the main course, I took a short course on Machine Learning & Digital Humanities. This well-organized introduction provided a survey of RStudio applications in the text analysis using examples such as the corpus of Bob Dylan and the complete works of Jane Austen. Having had limited experience with RStudio before, it was nice to see this kind of application.           Learn more about DHSI and DLF’s Fellowship Program. In 2020, DHSI courses will be offered June 1-5 and 8-12.

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Announcing the 2019 DLF + DHSI Tuition Grant Recipients

LF is delighted to announce the recipients of six DLF+DHSI Tuition Grants to attend the Digital Humanities Summer Institute in Victoria, BC! The fellowship covers program tuition for one course at the Institute, which is taking place from June 3-7 and 10-14 this year. Meredith Hale (@artrunbrarian)  Meredith Hale is the metadata librarian at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. In this role she manages the library’s digital collections, which consist primarily of digitized materials from special collections, and creates and shares MODS metadata. She also provides technical support for the Digital Library of Tennessee (DLTN), a DPLA service hub. Hale previously worked in a number of art institutions, including the Yale Center for British Art, the Robert B. Haas Arts Library, the Ackland Art Museum, and the Royal Pavilion, Art Gallery, and Museums in Brighton, UK. She has been a member of ARLIS/NA since 2015 and is a practicing artist. Hale received her BFA from Syracuse University and holds graduate degrees in art history and information science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.   Colleen S. Harris Colleen S. Harris serves as the Digital and Data Services Librarian on the faculty of the California State University Channel Islands. Formerly an Information Literacy Coordinator and a Head of Access Services, she is the editor of So You Want to Be an Academic Library Director? (ALA Editions, 2017) and has authored various scholarly articles in Library Review, Journal of Access Services, and Journal of Academic Librarianship. She holds the MS in Library and Information Science, an MFA in Writing, an MA in Mythological Studies, and an EdD in Learning and Leadership.     Amira Hathout  I am Amira Hathout from Egypt. I have started to work at the libraty of Alexandria ” Bibliotheca Alexandrina” since 2010 in the Digital Lab department, for 3 years in OCRing section and more than 5 years in the Quality Assurance section until present.I am a Quality Assurance-PDF specialist and my job is to review the whole digitisation process and outputs before being published. I participated in many digitisation projects and special tasks such as Thesis, Arabic & Latin books, Newspapers “CEDEJ project- Egyptian press Archive”, rare books and world digital library project. Last year I had the chance to visit the UK, during my stay I attended two workshops concerning digitisation, it was an amazing and valuable experience. My hobbies are reading, travelling and community volunteer work.   Jasmine Kirby Originally hailing from Chicago, Jasmine is a subject liaison librarian for psychology and human development and family studies at Iowa State University of Science and Technology in Ames, Iowa. She has a masters degree in library and information science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she also did her undergraduate degree. As an undergraduate she majored in history and spent a junior year abroad at Paris Institute of Political Science (Sciences Po). She is interested in digital humanities as a way to create learning materials that are interactive, accessible, and even fun, without sacrificing accuracy. She is a member of the American Library Association and a 2016 Spectrum Scholar.   Marcia McIntosh (@marcimic) Marcia McIntosh received her master’s degree in Information Studies (MSIS) from the University of Texas at Austin School of Information and bachelors from Washington University in St. Louis. She is currently the Digital Production Librarian at the University of North Texas where she assists in the management of digitization projects in the Digital Projects Lab. Alongside imaging production work, she pursues research in the areas of digitization, project development, and 3D data preservation.     Shu Wan Shu Wan currently works as a graduate student in the Department of History at the University of Iowa. His research interests focus on the history of anthropometry and physical anthropology in East Asia and North America in the 20th century. He also serves as an adjunct researcher in the Research Center for Social History of Medicine at Shaanxi Normal University in China and a book review editor in multiple academic journals in China, including World History Studies and Journal of History of Social Medicine in China.   Keep an eye out for blog posts from each awardee mid-summer, when they will share a bit about their time in Victoria. DHSI registration is still open, though courses are nearing capacity! Anyone affiliated with a DLF member institution may use the DLF discount code available here: dhsi.org/registration.html.

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Call for Applications: 2019 DLF + DHSI Tuition Grants

e are now taking applications for tuition grants to the 2019 Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) in Victoria, B.C.! The Digital Humanities Summer Institute has grown by leaps and bounds, and we are excited to connect our DLF-DHSI Tuition Grant recipients with its extensive offerings in the summer of 2019. (June 3-7 and 10-14) Members not interested in a tuition scholarship opportunity are welcome to register for DHSI courses at any time, using DLF discount codes available here: dhsi.org/registration.html. (You must be affiliated with a DLF member institution to use the codes. Courses fill quickly, so don’t delay!) Application The application requests the following information: contact information brief, one-paragraph bio a one-paragraph statement about how attending DHSI might expand your professional horizons, what you hope to learn, and what skills or ideas you might bring back from DHSI to the DLF community. The award will cover tuition only, and is only available to participants from DLF member institutions. (Check your eligibility.) Applicants or their employers are responsible for the costs of travel and lodging, and winners must register by April 1st in order to use the award. DLF-DHSI Cross-Pollinators will also be invited to contribute a DLF blog post about their experiences after the event. Applications are due November 23rd.   Please contact awards@diglib.org with any questions. About DHSI The Digital Humanities Summer Institute provides an ideal environment for discussing and learning about new computing technologies and how they are influencing teaching, research, dissemination, creation, and preservation in different disciplines, via a community-based approach. A time of intensive coursework, seminars, and lectures, participants at DHSI share ideas and methods, and develop expertise in using advanced technologies. Every summer, the institute brings together faculty, staff, and students from the Arts, Humanities, Library, and Archives communities as well as independent scholars and participants from areas beyond. Described by one participant as an event that “combines the best aspects of a skills workshop, international conference, and summer camp,” the DHSI prides itself on its friendly, informal, and collegial atmosphere. We invite you to join the DHSI community in Victoria for a time of focused practice, learning, and connecting with (and making new) friends and colleagues. About the DLF Tuition Grants We make a growing number of travel and tuition grants available year-round to DLF members and to the broader community invested in digital library work. Many of these grants bring individuals from other communities to the DLF Forum, or help DLF practitioners who wish to build a dynamic and diverse peer network make it to events they may not otherwise attend. Learn about Previous Awardees Read reflections on DHSI 2018 from Steven D. Booth and Jennifer Nichols & DHSI 2017 from Chelcie Rowell, Rebecca Chung, and John Edward Martin.  

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Announcing 2018 DLF + DHSI Cross-Pollinator Tuition Award Recipients

LF is delighted to announce the recipients of two DLF-DHSI Cross-Pollinator Tuition Awards to attend the Digital Humanities Summer Institute in Victoria, BC! The fellowship covers program tuition for one session at the Institute (June 4-8 or 11-15) as well as registration for DLFxDHSI, a one-day unconference on the theme of digital libraries, digital humanities, and social justice (June 8-9).  A native of Chicago, Steven D. Booth (@misterBooth) is the audiovisual archivist at the Barack Obama Presidential Library. He has worked for the U.S. National Archives since 2009 and previously held positions with the Presidential Materials Division and at the White House in the Office of Records Management. Booth is the co-founder of Archivists of Metro D.C. and is actively involved in theSociety of American Archivists (SAA) where he has served in numerous leadership roles and is currently a member of SAA Council. He holds a B.A. from Morehouse College and a M.S. in library science from Simmons College. Jennifer Nichols (@jennytnichols) is the Digital Scholarship Librarian and interim Department Head for the Office of Digital Innovation and Stewardship at the University of Arizona Libraries, and Co-Director for the iSpace, the libraries’ innovation and maker space. She is developing a Digital Scholarship program for the campus community, combining efforts with Data Science and GIS specialists to deliver comprehensive support and service across all disciplines. Nichols leads several initiatives to connect faculty and students to new tools for digital scholarship, including Virtual Reality, and organizes multiple large events to network learners. She has been a liaison librarian to the colleges of Fine Arts and Humanities, where she helped faculty incorporate information literacy into the curriculum, and integrate emerging technology into their research and teaching. She was formerly affiliated with the Pima County Public Library as Project Manager of a YOUmedia Learning Labs Planning grant from IMLS and the MacArthur Foundation, and directed a youth-led design process for the creation of 101Space, a youth media and makerspace. Prior to library work, she worked as a non-profit program evaluator, grant writer, and editor. Registration is still open for both DHSI (though courses are filling quickly!) and DLFxDHSI.

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Call for Applications: 2018 DLF + DHSI Tuition Awards

e are now taking applications for tuition fellowships to the 2018 Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) in Victoria, B.C.! The Digital Humanities Summer Institute has grown by leaps and bounds, and we are excited to connect “DLF-DHSI Cross-Pollinator Fellows” with its extensive offerings in the summer of 2018 (June 4-8 + 11-15). We’re also thrilled to be hosting DLFxDHSI, a one-day unconference on the theme of digital libraries, digital humanities, and social justice (June 8-9). Join us and register here! Members not interested in a tuition scholarship opportunity are welcome to register for DHSI courses at any time, using DLF discount codes available here: dhsi.org/registration.html. (You must be affiliated with a DLF member institution to use the codes. Courses fill quickly, so don’t delay!) Consider staying longer or arriving earlier to attend our unconference! Application The application requests the following information: contact information brief, one-paragraph bio a one-paragraph statement about how attending DHSI might expand your professional horizons, what you hope to learn, and what skills or ideas you might bring back from DHSI to the DLF community. The award will cover tuition only, and is only available to participants from DLF member institutions. (Check your eligibility.) Applicants or their employers are responsible for the costs of travel and lodging, and winners must register by April 1st in order to use the award. DLF-DHSI Cross-Pollinators will also be invited to contribute a DLF blog post about their experiences after the event. Applications are due February 20. Apply online here.  Please contact awards@diglib.org with any questions. About DHSI The Digital Humanities Summer Institute provides an ideal environment for discussing and learning about new computing technologies and how they are influencing teaching, research, dissemination, creation, and preservation in different disciplines, via a community-based approach. A time of intensive coursework, seminars, and lectures, participants at DHSI share ideas and methods, and develop expertise in using advanced technologies. Every summer, the institute brings together faculty, staff, and students from the Arts, Humanities, Library, and Archives communities as well as independent scholars and participants from areas beyond. Described by one participant as an event that “combines the best aspects of a skills workshop, international conference, and summer camp,” the DHSI prides itself on its friendly, informal, and collegial atmosphere. We invite you to join the DHSI community in Victoria for a time of focused practice, learning, and connecting with (and making new) friends and colleagues. About the DLF Cross-Pollinator Awards We make a growing number of travel and tuition grants available year-round to DLF members and to the broader community invested in digital library work. Many of these grants bring individuals from other communities to the DLF Forum, or help DLF practitioners who wish to build a dynamic and diverse peer network make it to conferences they may not otherwise attend. Our goal is to create “cross-pollinators”—professionals who move freely among our (sometimes walled) gardens. In an increasingly networked world, DLF means to increase communication between all groups interested in the future of information, including museums, libraries, colleges and universities, and anyone working in digital collections and services. Learn about Previous Awardees Digital Humanities training through DLF & DHSI, 12 October 2015 2015 DLF + DHSI Cross-Pollinators, 18 November 2015 Reflections on DHSI 2017 from Chelcie Rowell, Rebecca Chung, and John Edward Martin

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