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Editors’ Choice

Editors’ Choice: Cited Loci of the Aeneid – Searching through JSTOR’s content the classicists’ way

The sheer amount of data contained in JSTOR raises the question of what is the most effective way for scholars to search it. The answer to this question is inevitably going to be discipline-specific as scholars in different fields do have different strategies for retrieving bibliographic information. For students and scholars in Classics, for example,…

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Editors’ Choice: Bridging the Academic-Public Divide Through Podcasts

[The text of my keynote at the Sound Education conference at Harvard on November 2, 2018. This was the first annual conference on educational and academic podcasts, and gathered hundreds of producers of audio and podcast listeners to discuss how podcasting can effectively and engagingly reach diverse audiences interested in a wide range of scholarly…

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Editors’ Choice: The Uncanny Valley and the Ghost in the Machine – a discussion of analogies for thinking about digitized medieval manuscripts

This is a version of a paper I presented at the University of Kansas Digital Humanities Seminar, Co-Sponsored with the Hall Center for the Humanities on September 17, 2018. … So this is great. We’re doing very important work making data about manuscripts available to the world, in ways that make it easy to reuse them,…

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Editors’ Choice: The Uncanny Valley and the Ghost in the Machine – a discussion of analogies for thinking about digitized medieval manuscripts

This is a version of a paper I presented at the University of Kansas Digital Humanities Seminar, Co-Sponsored with the Hall Center for the Humanities on September 17, 2018. … So this is great. We’re doing very important work making data about manuscripts available to the world, in ways that make it easy to reuse them,…

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Editors’ Choice: “This is Fine” – Reading, Making, and Archiving Memes after November 2016

On October 18th, 2018, I presented a talk as part of “(Re)Active Public History,” a Twitter Mini-Con put on by the National Council on Public History. Here’s the abstract I submitted for the conference (which you can also find here): A cartoon dog sits with a cup of coffee in a room that is engulfed…

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Editors’ Choice: Machine Teaching, Machine Learning, and the History of the Future of Public Education

These are my prepared remarks, delivered on a panel titled “Outsourcing the Classroom to Ed Tech & Machine-learning: Why Parents & Teachers Should Resist” at the Network for Public Education conference in Indianapolis. The other panelists were Peter Greene and Leonie Haimson. I had fifteen minutes to speak; clearly this is more than I could…

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Editors’ Choice: Intentionally Digital, Intentionally Black – A Keynote Conversation

This past weekend, AADHum (African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities) held its first national conference, Intentionally Digital, Intentionally Black, on the University of Maryland. The conference’s “Keynote Conversation,” held on Saturday, October 20th, featured Dr. André Brock (Associate Professor, School of Literature, Media, and Communication, Georgia Institute of Technology) and Dr. Jessica Marie Johnson (Assistant Professor,… Read more »

Editors’ Choice: Ctrl Alt Delete – Aleia Brown Digital Dialogues Presentation

Revolutionary dreams erupt out of political engagement; collective social movements are incubators of new knowledge.  Robin D.G.  Kelly, Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination This presentation traces the arc of Museums Respond to Ferguson and #BlkTwitterstorians–two born digital projects that emerged at the height of the Movement for Black Lives. The chats started with queries that… Read more »

Editors’ Choice: Hyperlocal Histories and Digital Collections

This is a slightly extended version of a talk I presented at the Digital Library Federation 2018 Forum, held in Las Vegas in October 2018. Thanks to students in my Fall 2017 “Digital Public Humanities” course; the Providence Public Library Special Collections department; Diane O’Donoghue; Julieanne Fontana, Angela Feng, and Jasmine Chu; Monica Muñoz Martinez; Susan Smulyan;… Read more »

Editors’ Choice: Enslaved People in Eighteenth-century Britain – An Interview with Nelson Mundell

In today’s post, Keisha N. Blain, Senior Editor of Black Perspectives, interviews Nelson Mundell about the new online database, Runaway Slaves in Britain: Bondage, Freedom and Race in the Eighteenth Century. Mundell is a former History teacher with a MEd in Education and is finishing his history PhD thesis, “The Runaway Enslaved in Eighteenth-century Britain,” at… Read more »

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