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Digital Library Federation

ISLE: Islandora Installation Simplified – A Learn@DLF Workshop

The following post was written by the leaders of the ISLE: Islandora Installation Simplified session  at Learn@DLF: a day of workshops proceeding the 2018 DLF Forum. Email us at forum@diglib.org to add it to your existing registration! David Keiser-Clark: Academic Application Developer, Williams College Francesca Livermore: Digital Projects Librarian: Wesleyan University Derek Merleaux: Senior Project Manager, Born-Digital Diego Pino Navarro: Software Developer, METRO.org Benjamin Rosner: Senior Instructional Applications Developer, Barnard College ISLE is a consortially-funded, next-generation docker-based infrastructure platform for Islandora. The magic and beauty of ISLE is that you are able to easily keep your Islandora system up to date with quarterly (or so) ISLE updates; each maintenance update is comprehensive and requires less than an hour to patch. Come to this workshop and explore ISLE with a bunch of friendly wizards to help you along the way!   The workshop will introduce ISLE for Islandora, a digital collection repository platform, and use it to spin up a full Islandora 7.x stack. Participants with a wide variety of skill sets will be welcomed and supported in hands-on work with ISLE. Anyone who works with installation or maintenance of Islandora, people from small institutions with Islandora repositories, and folks considering migrating to Islandora are especially encouraged to attend. Participants need not have development skills to attend, but do need attention to detail and a willingness to follow instructions for working with the command line. A laptop is required.   Islandora is a powerful digital repository toolkit comprised of more than 80 different open-source software libraries. This complex ecosystem makes Islandora difficult and expensive to install, maintain and customize. By utilizing pre-built, disposable Docker containers in conjunction with permanent but separable data stores, ISLE lowers the barrier to entry for new schools while also allowing existing institutions to reallocate maintenance budgets towards development or ingestion. ISLE offers an appealing jump-start for institutions considering migrating from a proprietary digital repository to a Fedora-based open source collections management platform. Visit the Learn@DLF website to learn more about available workshops. Ready to enroll? Email forum@diglib.org to add HuMetricsHSS to your existing Forum registration.

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ISLE: Islandora Installation Simplified – A Learn@DLF Workshop

The following post was written by the leaders of the ISLE: Islandora Installation Simplified session  at Learn@DLF: a day of workshops proceeding the 2018 DLF Forum. Email us at forum@diglib.org to add it to your existing registration! David Keiser-Clark: Academic Application Developer, Williams College Francesca Livermore: Digital Projects Librarian: Wesleyan University Derek Merleaux: Senior Project Manager, Born-Digital Diego Pino Navarro: Software Developer, METRO.org Benjamin Rosner: Senior Instructional Applications Developer, Barnard College ISLE is a consortially-funded, next-generation docker-based infrastructure platform for Islandora. The magic and beauty of ISLE is that you are able to easily keep your Islandora system up to date with quarterly (or so) ISLE updates; each maintenance update is comprehensive and requires less than an hour to patch. Come to this workshop and explore ISLE with a bunch of friendly wizards to help you along the way!   The workshop will introduce ISLE for Islandora, a digital collection repository platform, and use it to spin up a full Islandora 7.x stack. Participants with a wide variety of skill sets will be welcomed and supported in hands-on work with ISLE. Anyone who works with installation or maintenance of Islandora, people from small institutions with Islandora repositories, and folks considering migrating to Islandora are especially encouraged to attend. Participants need not have development skills to attend, but do need attention to detail and a willingness to follow instructions for working with the command line. A laptop is required.   Islandora is a powerful digital repository toolkit comprised of more than 80 different open-source software libraries. This complex ecosystem makes Islandora difficult and expensive to install, maintain and customize. By utilizing pre-built, disposable Docker containers in conjunction with permanent but separable data stores, ISLE lowers the barrier to entry for new schools while also allowing existing institutions to reallocate maintenance budgets towards development or ingestion. ISLE offers an appealing jump-start for institutions considering migrating from a proprietary digital repository to a Fedora-based open source collections management platform. Visit the Learn@DLF website to learn more about available workshops. Ready to enroll? Email forum@diglib.org to add HuMetricsHSS to your existing Forum registration.

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Human scale web collecting for individuals and institutions: A Learn@DLF Workshop

The following post was contributed by Anna Perricci, who will lead the Human scale web collecting for individuals and institutions (Webrecorder workshop) at Learn@DLF: a day of workshops preceeding the 2018 DLF Forum. Email us at forum@diglib.org to add it to your existing registration! Anna (@AnnaPerricci) is Associate Director, Strategic Partnerships, Webrecorder at Rhizome.     It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the all the challenges that web archiving bring to those of us based in libraries, archives and museums. Web archiving ‘at scale’ is usually equated to collecting with automated software (a web crawler) but an assumption that more information is equated to more value is not always right, especially with web archives. A massive scope or scale isn’t required to make meaningful, useful web archives. Collecting at a ‘human scale’ can be as good or better for forming certain collections. In this workshop we’ll take some time to cover fundamental concepts in web archiving, including defining terms, exploring main components of web archiving workflows, discussing how one can scope a web collection and how to share what’s collected. After the groundwork is laid we can dig in and begin creating collections with Webrecorder.io. Webrecorder (webrecorder.io) is a free, easy to use, browser based web archiving tool set provided by Rhizome. Rhizome, an affiliate of the New Museum in New York City, champions born-digital art and culture through commissions, exhibitions, digital preservation, and software development. Webrecorder’s development has been generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. With Webrecorder you can make high fidelity interactive captures of web content as you browse web pages. A “high fidelity capture” means that from a user’s perspective there is a complete or high level of similarity between the original web pages and the archived copies, including the retention of important characteristics and functionality such as: video or audio that requires a user to press ‘play’, or resources that require entry of login credentials for access (e.g. social media accounts). Webrecorder can capture most types of media files, JavaScript and user-triggered actions, which are things that most crawlers struggle with or are unable to obtain. Workshop attendees will be given an overview of Webrecorder’s features, then engage in hands-on activities and discussions. Further instruction will alternate with opportunities for participants to use the tools introduced and share their thoughts or questions. Instructions on how to manage the collected materials, download them (as a WARC file), and open a local copy offline using Webrecorder Player will also be covered in this workshop.   Human scale web collecting with Webrecorder is not expected to meet all the requirements of a large web archiving program but can satisfy many needs of researchers or smaller web collecting initiatives. Webrecorder can be a great tool for personal digital archiving projects as well. Larger web archiving programs can benefit from using Webrecorder to capture dynamic content and user-triggered behaviors on websites. The WARC files created with Webrecorder can be downloaded and ingested to join WARCs that have been created using crawler-based systems. With a tool like Webrecorder anyone can get started with web archiving quickly at no cost, which is empowering both to information professionals and their stakeholders. I hope you will be able to join us for this workshop on October 14th at Learn@DLF! Visit the Learn@DLF website to learn more about available workshops. Ready to enroll? Email forum@diglib.org to add HuMetricsHSS to your existing Forum registration.

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HuMetricsHSS and the Value of Values: A Learn@DLF Workshop

The following post was written by Nicky Agate and Jason Rhody; two of the leaders of the HuMetricsHSS and the Value of Values session  at Learn@DLF: a day of workshops proceeding the 2018 DLF Forum. Email us at forum@diglib.org to add it to your existing registration!   Nicky Agate is Assistant Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Projects at Columbia University        Jason Rhody is currently Director of the Digital Culture program, Social Data Initiative, and co-director of the Media & Democracy program at the Social Science Research Council (SSRC)        What if all the decisions and activities that go into our (often invisible) professional practice were made explicit, evaluated, and rewarded? When we catalog, or put on an exhibit, design a libguide, or collaborate with others on a digital project, how do we articulate goals to better measure our professional success? At our Learn@DLF workshop, the HuMetricsHSS team will work with participants to tease out the practices and decisions that go into information work, and how they are motivated by personal and professional values. Our first goal in this workshop is to start thinking together about the implicit or explicit values that underpin our professional activities, align those values with professional goals and activities, and begin to link them to professional and personal evaluation.     In the Value of Values workshop, HuMetricsHSS team members will guide you through a set of exercises designed to help you (and your colleagues) articulate the values that inform your professional life. You will work alongside other workshop participants to argue for, negotiate, and perhaps reformulate these values, with the goal of emerging in a space of productive compromise that allows for difference and mutual respect.   Consensus and compromise can be hard, but they are the basis of any shared understanding in an institutional setting. Being able to debate and articulate our own values, and listen to others express theirs, opens up space to think together about a framework for assessment and evaluation based on negotiated values, rather than on arbitrary, quantitative indicators of “excellence.” If you asked yourself what sort of support structure exists to guide, evaluate, and assess professional practices in your institution, would you be able to answer? Is that structure imposed from the top down, separated from mission statements, or dictated by altmetric or administrative algorithms?  Is there an evaluative framework against which you can test the decisions in the teaching, collecting, cataloging, mentoring, assessing, project managing, or publishing that make up your day-to-day work as an information professional? And how does that framework, if it exists, express an enactment of personal or purported institutional values?     Chances are, it doesn’t—but it could. In the Value of Values workshop, we will share a framework for  discussing and negotiating values, with the aim of helping you to establish a departmental or institutional approach to evaluating library work that allows for and incentivizes the performance of those values. Get more information about Learn@DLF on our website. Ready to enroll? Email forum@diglib.org to add HuMetricsHSS to your existing Forum registration.

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Digital Library Federation Names Three New “DLF Futures Fellows”

Today, the Digital Library Federation (DLF) named three distinguished fellows in the pilot year of a new DLF Futures fellowship program. This program offers financial support and a communications platform for mid-career digital library practitioners whose projects and areas of research open up new, perhaps unexpected possibilities and future directions for the field.   DLF’s 2018-19 Futures Fellows are Ana Ndumu of the University of Maryland College of Information, Santi Thompson of the University of Houston Libraries, and Hannah Scates Kettler of the University of Iowa Libraries. Through the course of the fellowship year, Ndumu, Thompson, and Scates Kettler will undertake projects that explore topics as diverse as the fostering of organizational partnerships between iSchools and historically black colleges and universities; more nuanced ways to measure and assess the transformative reuse of digital library content; and future applications for 3D cultural heritage visualization. DLF director Bethany Nowviskie said, “We’re delighted to launch the DLF Futures fellowship program with awards to three people whose work we admire so much. It will be a great pleasure to follow their progress and see the paths they chart for the Digital Library Federation community.” “We extend our thanks to Ana, Hannah, and Santi for taking part in the first year of an exciting new program. Each of them brings so much possibility to this new model of support,” added Becca Quon, DLF program associate for advancement and awards. “We know they’ll run with the fellowship, and DLF is excited to cheer them on as they do.” About the DLF Futures Fellows:   The DLF Futures Fellowship pilot is funded through the generous support of Digital Library Federation member organizations. DLF is an international network of member institutions and a robust community of practice, advancing research, learning, social justice, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies. It is a program of CLIR, the Council on Library and Information Resources — an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning. CLIR promotes forward-looking collaborative solutions that transcend disciplinary, institutional, professional, and geographic boundaries in support of the public good.

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2018 GLAM Cross-Pollinator Registration Awards

Museum and library staff face similar challenges in the digital landscape and yet have too few opportunities to come together.   For a third year, the Digital Library Federation and its partner organizations will support six registration awards meant to encourage collaboration and conversation about these challenges among our museum and digital library communities. Three awards were offered to partner-affiliated GLAM professionals to attend the 2018 DLF Forum in Las Vegas, and in exchange, three DLF-affiliated practitioners will receive complimentary registration at the upcoming conferences of the following partnering organizations: the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC), the Museum Computer Network (MCN), and the Visual Resources Association (VRA). About the GLAM Cross-Pollinator Registration Awards Continuing a program initially supported generous Kress grants in 2015-2017 and with the continuing partnership of the AIC, MCN, and VRA, the Cross-Pollinator program endeavors to build bridges among our communities, bringing new voices and perspectives to our Forum–particularly those from the art museum community–and continuing our efforts at “cross-pollination” by sending accomplished DLF practitioners to valuable conferences they might not otherwise visit. An award covers the cost of registration at one partner conference, and can be applied retroactively for a full refund if payment has already been submitted. Conference dates are as follows: Museum Computer Network: November 13-16 2018, Denver, CO Visual Resources Association: March 26-29 2019, Los Angeles, CA The American Institute for Conservation: May 13-17 2019, Uncasville CT Awardees’ only obligations to DLF are to fully engage in the conference they attend and write a brief reflection on their experience for the DLF blog. Eligibility To be eligible for a GLAM Cross-Pollinator Award, an applicant must be affiliated with a DLF member organization. Successful candidates will demonstrate a commitment to advancing research, learning, social justice, and/or the common good through the creation and/or use of digital library and museum technologies. Application Applicants must supply contact information, a resume or C.V., and a personal statement (500 words or less) about how attending the conference of your choice will expand your professional horizons, and what you can contribute in the role of ‘cross-pollinator’. Deadlines Applications for each award will close at 5:00 p.m. pacific time on each of the following dates: To attend MCN: 14 September 2018 To attend VRA: 14 December 2018 To attend AIC: 8 March 2019 Applicants will be notified of their status within two weeks of the closing date. —————————————————————————————– Award winners for all opportunities will be selected by CLIR/DLF staff in consultation with partner organizations. You may apply for multiple awards, but preference will be given to applicants who have not yet been a GLAM Cross-Pollinator Fellow.

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Fellow Reflection: Jennifer Nichols

Jennifer Nichols (@jennytnichols) is the Digital Scholarship Librarian and interim Department Head for the Office of Digital Innovation and Stewardship at the University of Arizona Libraries, and Co-Director for the iSpace, the libraries’ innovation and maker space. She attended the Digital Humanities Summer Institute and the DLFxDHSI unconference in Victoria, BC with support from a Cross-Pollinator Tuition Award. Learn more about Jennifer, or read on for her reflection on her experience. Thank you to DLF for the generous support to attend DHSI and the first ever DLFxDHSI unconference. It goes without saying that 10 days in the Pacific Northwest, in the beautiful city of Victoria, is a gift that anyone could appreciate. Verdant green landscapes accented with bold floral displays are a sensory delight, and do wonders to restore my sense of connection to this earth, and to my work here upon it. Now, coming into this inviting environment from the Sonoran desert in early June is like transporting unto another planet. I joked that I would be the only one sporting a down coat. Though I hesitated, I’m glad I brought it for those two chilly, rainy days. As an academic librarian, I often struggle to maintain my identity as a scholar. I am consumed with the entirety of my role–building partnerships, running programs, consulting with students and faculty, managing staff. Though scholarship is a part of my job, it is a small part (5-10% in fact, depending on the year). I know I’m not alone in that, and one of the most meaningful experiences for me at DHSI was the opportunity to connect with others in similar roles as my own. I participated in week one of DHSI and attended the Web APIs and Python class taught by CUNY Grad Center librarian Stephen Zweibel and grad students Jojo Karlin, Patrick Smyth, and Jonathan Reeve (of Columbia University). I chose this class because I wanted to learn a new, tangible skill, and Python is one of those things that I have struggled to apply, and thus never made any progress. I wanted to come away having built something, so naturally, I used my time and the expertise of my instructors, to create a database of superhero stats to examine the sexism (duh) inherent in the design of their skills and talents. Stay tuned for part two, the Twitter bot that faces off male and female superheroes… So many dynamic and relevant conversations were happening at the Institute, and when I listened to the courses (and unconferences and brown bags) described in lively and inviting ways during the welcome session, I was impressed. As anyone who has attended DHSI will tell you, you cannot possibly do it all, and though you may be tempted, it is not recommended. Take comfort that these conversations are happening, and know that there are many ways to jump in. The Race and DH course was one such conversation that encouraged me. As the conversation spilled out into the whole group, and flowed into each classroom and over Twitter, I was relieved. These are essential to our DH pedagogy work and should not be confined to one course. In my time at DHSI, I also wanted to connect with others, and my final day at the DLFxDHSI unconference on Social Justice and Digital Libraries was the perfect way to end my experience. After a week of learning Python with mostly grad students and scholars, I was so happy to be reunited with my library tribe! I reflected and applied learning from the week with like-minded professionals, met new people who shared my work, who wanted to think about alternative ways of doing and being together. The conversations we cultivated were enlightening and pertinent. We asked questions like How can we advance social justice on faculty projects that are “not yours”? Is there a difference between Environmental Justice and Climate Justice? In what ways are we still not valuing indigenous discourse? We considered ways to dismantle racists, sexist, and ableist constructions and how to interrogate the power that archivists hold. What else can I say? The week was dynamic and full, and I am so grateful to have spent this time as a student, a learner and a colleague. Thanks DLF, for bringing me here, and for bringing the two communities together. Without you, I may never have seen myself as belonging here.

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How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Use a MAP!

Lisa Barrier, Asset Cataloger (right) and Kathryn Gronsbell, Digital Collections Manager (left) work together in the Carnegie Hall Archives. Kathryn is also an active member of the DLF Metadata Assessment Working Group, and co-leads its Website subgroup. In celebration of Preservation Week 2018, Carnegie Hall Archives released the initial version of its Digital Collections Metadata Application Profile. The Metadata Application Profile (MAP), co-authored by Lisa Barrier (Asset Cataloger) and Kathryn Gronsbell (Digital Collections Manager), describes metadata elements for item-level asset records within the Carnegie Hall Digital Collections. Our goal for developing the initial MAP was to begin to assess our metadata maturity. We recognized the opportunity to document and share the Carnegie Hall (CH) metadata standards, cataloging procedures, and controlled vocabularies. We want to share the relatively streamlined process for generating and publishing a MAP to encourage others to consider this path for self-assessment of collections metadata. We expected this level of metadata wrangling and organization to be a daunting task. However, we realized the benefits of utilizing the resources in the DLF AIG Metadata Application Profile Clearinghouse Project, which is part of the larger Assessment Toolkit. We opted for a simple MAP profile format of a “Quick Look” summary and a separate, detailed elements table. We created the Quick Look, a list of metadata elements and their obligations (required, mandatory if applicable, and optional). We then compiled element descriptions and pulled sample data from the CH Digital Collections to create entries in the Elements table. The samples helped us identify controlled vocabularies, free-text fields, and different sources and structures. We described input guidelines to clarify how to populate each element field. We referenced the Sample Metrics for Common Metadata Quality Criteria and followed instructions for building “Your Application Profile” in the Framework section of the Toolkit. This metadata gathering and documentation process took approximately eight hours, over three days. Internal documents and implementations were referenced to create the elements table and Quick Look: staff training wiki entry for uploading and tagging material; cataloging requirements; Carnegie Hall/Empire State Digital Network (ESDN) Mapping exercise supported by the Metropolitan Library Council (METRO) to prepare for contributing to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA); local taxonomy managed in the CH digital asset management system; and integrated performance history data, which has its own authority control (version available at data.carnegiehall.org). We published the MAP via our institutional GitHub account (github.com/CarnegieHall), using the GitHub Pages option with a default Jekyll template. GitHub Pages is a feature that semi-automatically turns repository content into streamlined websites, useful for presentation and ongoing maintenance. We translated the elements table from a draft spreadsheet to a text document using the lightweight markup language Markdown. Markdown text displays in GitHub documents and GitHub Pages as formatted text. Because of the lengthy elements table, we chose to create a MAP overview homepage to link to the elements and to the Quick Look. We borrowed language and structure from Clearinghouse examples and other open documentation projects to draft a brief overview, feedback options, and acknowledgements. The publishing, formatting, summation, and copy-editing process took roughly four hours, over two days. Our initial MAP release demonstrates significant progress in metadata documentation through a small investment of time. Two staff members organized, drafted, and implemented the CH Digital Collections MAP in about 12 hours, over 2 weeks. Through the process, we prioritized metadata fields for evaluation, revision, or removal. We used the MAP to update our internal Digital Collections wiki, which guides CH staff members how to add and edit system metadata. While some elements map to Dublin Core and to DPLA properties, others are CH specific. These elements require further research for normalization and interoperability. Future additions to the MAP will include mapping to DPLA properties, Dublin Core, and other appropriate metadata schema. We recently contributed the CH MAP to the DLF AIG Metadata Application Profile Clearinghouse Project. We hope that others can borrow formatting or content from our profile, as well as provide constructive feedback so we can continue to correct, clarify, and improve the site.

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