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Editors’ Choice: Journey to Humbead’s

early virtual reality experiments with humbead’s revised map of the world. What would it mean to enter into the space of a map that itself reimagines the spatial relationships of the world? The digital history project Revising Humbead’s Revised Map of the World: Digitally Remapping the Sixties Folk Music Revival explores a psychedelic mattering map…

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Job: Professorship of Digital Humanities, Cambridge

From the ad: The Board of Electors to the Professorship of Digital Humanities invite applications for this Professorship from persons whose work falls within the general field of Digital Humanities to take up appointment on 1 September 2019 or as soon as possible thereafter. Candidates will have an outstanding record of international stature in research…

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Job: Professorship of Digital Humanities, Cambridge

From the ad: The Board of Electors to the Professorship of Digital Humanities invite applications for this Professorship from persons whose work falls within the general field of Digital Humanities to take up appointment on 1 September 2019 or as soon as possible thereafter. Candidates will have an outstanding record of international stature in research…

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Opportunity: Networking Archives Training Schools and Colloquium

About the opportunity: ‘Networking Archives’ (networkingarchives.org) is a three-year collaborative research project that will merge the early modern correspondence data collected in ‘Early Modern Letters Online’ with metadata from ‘Gale State Papers Online’. The resulting dataset and accompanying infrastructure will allow researchers to interrogate and analyse epistolary metadata to pose new kinds of questions on…

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Opportunity: Networking Archives Training Schools and Colloquium

About the opportunity: ‘Networking Archives’ (networkingarchives.org) is a three-year collaborative research project that will merge the early modern correspondence data collected in ‘Early Modern Letters Online’ with metadata from ‘Gale State Papers Online’. The resulting dataset and accompanying infrastructure will allow researchers to interrogate and analyse epistolary metadata to pose new kinds of questions on…

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Report: A Research Agenda for Historical and Multilingual Optical Character Recognition

About the report: The Office of Digital Humanities (ODH) is excited to announce the publication of an important new report titled “A Research Agenda for Historical and Multilingual Optical Character Recognition.” The report, funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and authored by David Smith and Ryan Cordell of Northeastern University, outlines a set of…

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Resource: How badly is Google Books search broken, and why?

From the resource: I periodically write about Google Books here, so I thought I’d point out something that I’ve noticed recently that should be concerning to anyone accustomed to treating it as the largest collection of books: it appears that when you use a year constraint on book search, the search index has dramatically constricted…

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Resource: Syllabus – Digitizing Folk Music History

From the resource: Pivoting between technology and tradition—between digital computers and acoustic guitars—in this interdepartmental course, we use tactics of digital analysis to investigate the US folk music revival, from its nineteenth-century origins to the 1960s “Great Folk Scare” to more recent modes of folk revivalism. Students acquire digital skills and fluencies by applying them to historical and contextual thinking about…

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Updates from the DLF Assessment Interest Group (AIG)

he DLF Assessment Interest Group (AIG), founded in 2014, seeks to engage the community in developing best practices and guidelines for various kinds of digital library assessment. Research and cultural heritage institutions are, as a matter of course, providing online access to converted and born-digital scholarly and cultural content. As the amount of that content continues to grow, there is an increased need to strategically standardize our assessment efforts. The only requirement for participation in a DLF AIG working group is a willingness to dig in and devote a small part of your time contributing to the tools, methods, and body of knowledge on digital library assessment. Attendance at the DLF forum is not a requirement for participation in any of the working groups. Additionally, if your institution is not a DLF member, you can still participate! Please feel free to join these group activities, attend meetings, and get in touch with group leaders to learn more. AIG Content Reuse Working Group Over the next year, the DLF AIG Content Reuse Working Group is focused on planning and the beginning stages of building the Digital Content Reuse Assessment Framework Toolkit (D-CRAFT). D-CRAFT builds off of the successful Developing a Framework for Measuring Reuse of Digital Objects (Measuring Reuse) project, an IMLS grant initiative (LG-73-17-0002-17), which ran from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018. The team has focused on concluding the work of the Measuring Reuse project and setting the foundation for D-CRAFT. To date, the group has: Released Setting a Foundation for Assessing Content Reuse: A White Paper From the Developing a Framework for Measuring Reuse of Digital Objects (DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/BQJVR) in September 2018. Published “Barriers and solutions to assessing digital library reuse: preliminary findings” in Performance Measurement and Metrics, detailing the initial results of the Measuring Reuse project. Submitted an IMLS National Leadership Grants for Libraries proposal to build D-CRAFT. If awarded, the project will begin in Summer 2019 and last 2.5 years. How can you participate? Those interested in knowing more about the project should reach out to any team member (listed below). The Content Reuse Working Group: Elizabeth Kelly, Ayla Stein Kenfield, Caroline Muglia, Santi Thompson, and Liz Woolcott AIG Cost Assessment Working Group Cost Assessment Working Group in 2018 The Cost Assessment group’s primary task is to collect, aggregate, and share data on the time it takes to perform various tasks involved in the digitization process to help with project planning and benchmarking. When the group formed in 2014, we found few practical resources geared towards helping the community determine the cost of digitization. To help address this gap, we built a Digitization Cost Calculator that allows individuals to enter information about a project and get back an estimate of the staffing costs and time needed to complete it based on real data from the community. Our work in 2018 was focused on learning more about how the calculator was being used in the community and opportunities for improvement. Over the summer we had 11 volunteers participate in both user interview and user testing. Over the fall we reviewed the sessions, captured all of the feedback in a spreadsheet and started discussing and prioritizing our next steps in GitHub issues. For more information about the group, see the Cost Assessment Working Group wiki. The source code for the calculator is available via the Calculator’s GitHub repository. Goals for 2019 Our goal for 2019 will be to start working our way through the identified issues with the calculator with the goal of making the tool better. We plan to have a standing meeting every month to work together and discuss priorities. Some of what we’ve identified are feature requests, while others are more philosophical questions, like what is the purpose of the calculator. There is also the opportunity to work on the more technical side of the tool with Wayne Graham. How can you participate?   Join our meetings! We welcome participation from anyone with an interest in this area. If you join our Digital Library AIG Cost Assessment google group you will get notifications and invitations each time we meet. You’re also welcome to drop in on any of our standing meetings which are listed on the DLF Community Calendar and in our meeting agendas. Questions? Contact co-facilitator Sarah Severson. The group typically meets once a month, and the time commitment is generally less than an hour per week. AIG Cultural Assessment Working Group (CAWG) CAWG in 2019  CAWG was established in 2016 to discuss ways by which we may assess our digital collections and their cultural impact. Where lacking, CAWG will develop helpful and nuanced rubrics for institutional measurement and analysis of cultural biases and assumptions in the process of digital collection creation. In 2018 CAWG successfully Collaborated as a review board for the User Experience group bibliography project Conducted an environmental scan of relevant “diversity” events across the nation in order to understand the landscape of cultural assessment work Embarked on the Selection Workflow Framework draft #2 which refocused the Selection Workflow Framework into something more approachable to users Established a new Inclusive Metadata Task Force to address metadata creation practices and explicit/implicit bias. For more detail, check out our wiki page, and/or join our Slack channel. CAWG Goals for 2019 If you’re interested in what the group will do next, there are upcoming meetings which you are more than welcome to join (details below), where we will brainstorm and develop new goals for 2019! Here are some potential directions… Conduct new survey on Selection practices Identify relevant community groups for review of our work Develop a running Speaker Series to engage those working to address bias in the digital realm Collaborate with the Metadata Assessment group on a new project targeting inclusive and equitable metadata creation practices And others. Add your thoughts at our next meeting! How can you participate? We are looking for diverse perspectives and welcome participation from anyone. We are in particular need of Public Libraries, HBCUs, Tribal Libraries, and Museum perspectives. We are looking for people who are on the front lines of engaging community members, people Read More

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Job: Head of Digital Historical Research, Leibniz Institute of European History

From the ad: The Leibniz Institute of European History (IEG) in Mainz is an independent research institute within the Leibniz Association. It conducts research on the religious, political, social and cultural foundations of Europe in the early modern and modern period and runs an international fellowship programme. As a member of the Mainz Centre for…

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